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Latest Publications from WPFP

thumbnailspringStrengthening Student Success with Non-Academic Supports: The Role of State Policy

Student success is a top priority of community college reform efforts today. Most efforts focus on academic reforms geared toward traditional students. A new policy brief by The Working Poor Families Project suggests that more emphasis should be placed on non-academic support targeted to low-income adults at community colleges, especially student parents.

The brief offers a four-part framework of non-academic supports and services for low-income adult students and makes state policy recommendations to help ensure that non-academic supports are integrated into community college success efforts.

Read the Brief (PDF)

 

RacialDivideLow-Income Working Families: The Racial/Ethnic Divide

A new report by The Working Poor Families Project examines the large and growing economic divide among America’s 32.6 million working families, with whites and Asians at the top and other racial/ethnic groups—particularly blacks and Latinos—falling behind.
In 2013, there were 10.6 million low-income working families in America—racial/ethnic minorities constitute 58 percent of this group, despite only making up 40 percent of all working families nationwide. In addition, working families headed by racial/ethnic minorities were twice as likely to be poor or low-income (47 percent) compared with non-Hispanic whites (23 percent)—a gap that has increased since the onset of the Great Recession in 2007. There are significant state and regional variations in the economic well-being of minority working families as well.

The report calls on state policy leaders to address this economic divide, offering policy recommendations that address these inequalities, improve conditions for millions of lower-income parents and their children and promote economic growth.

Read the Report (PDF)

Strengthening State Policies for Working Families

Millions of American breadwinners work hard to support their families. But, despite their effort, almost one in three working families are mired in low-wage jobs that provide inadequate benefits and offer little opportunity for advancement and economic security. Compounding the problem are public policies that do not adequately prepare workers to advance to higher-skilled, higher-paying jobs or promote the creation of quality jobs.

The Working Poor Families Project (WPFP) was launched in 2002 by national philanthropic leaders who saw the need to strengthen state policies affecting these working families. This national initiative is now supported by the Annie E. Casey, Ford, Joyce and Kresge foundations. WPFP focuses on the states because their policies and investments critically affect the lives of working families.

The WPFP is active in 22 states and the District of Columbia. In each state the WPFP partners with one or more nonprofit organizations to strengthen state policies to better prepare America's working families for a more secure economic future.